Line Judge Hand Signals

While the game of badminton is on, both the service judge and the Line judges and thechair umpire work in tandem to realse a point in either of the opponents favour. Unlike a service judge there are also line judges for the back lines and side lines.

There are certain responsibilities assigned to a line judge like a service and the Chair Umpire. They are as follows.

A line judge should be seated 2.5-3.5m from the line and his main duty is to judge whether a shuttlecock lands “in” or “out”, of the outer lines deciding whether a player has scored a point.

There are three most common hand signals, they are

1. The shuttlecock lands out the line:

shuttlecock lands out the line.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

shuttlecock lands out the line.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

If the shuttlecock lands out of the line, then the judge must loudly and quickly shout “Out” so that both players and spectators hear, and will stretch their arms out to the side level with each other while looking at the umpire with a fixed stare to ensure the umpire is clear about the decision.

 

 

 

 

2. The shuttlecock lands inside the line:

shuttlecock lands inside the line.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

shuttlecock lands inside the line.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

If the shuttlecock lands inside the outer line or border, then the line judge will stretch their hand in front angling slightly down just point their right hand at the line.

 

 

 

 

3. If the line judge does not see:

line judge does not see.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

line judge does not see.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

If the line judge can’t see the shuttlecock clearly (because their view is blocked by a player’s body or other unavoidable situation), as they were unable to see whether the shuttlecock landed in or out they should cover the eyes with their hands to let the umpire know.

Every one can become line judges by carefully reading or watching and practising the required skills. But most of them are undoubtfully common sense.

Service Judge Hand Signals

We all know Badminton is a sport played dating to way back. First theere were no prope r rulews governing the game. This raised disputes among players. When the English Badminton Association was established in 1893 the rules were revised and unified and have since been the main basis for the sport.

People who play badminton should also understand the signals what the judges’ hand mean. Here will wil lsee the hand signals often used by the service judges in badminton competitions.

1. Delay of serve:

Delay Of Serve.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

Delay Of Serve.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

once the server and the receiver are ready for the service there should not be any delay in service. If there is a delay after a player finishes raising their racquet head backwards any delay after that is trmed “delay of serve.”

This is also applicable once a player begins to swing his/her racket forward, the service has begun and the racket must continue moving forward in a continuous movement until the serving action is completed, otherwise a fault will be called for non-continuous movement.

If any one of these occurs, then the service judge will swing their right arm to the left to indicate that a player has been penalized for undue delay.

2. Feet on the service line or off the ground:

Feet on the service line or off the ground.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

Feet on the service line or off the ground.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

The server and the player receiving the serve should stand in the diagonally opposite service courts and must not tread on the service court boundary line. This rule states that the server and receiver’s feet must at least be touching the ground partially and should remain fixed in place from when the serve begins to when the action is completed. When this does not happen the service judge will stretch out their right leg and signal a fault with their right hand because a player’s feet were off the ground or they were on the boundary line.

 

 

 

3. Server fails to hit the bottom of the shuttlecock:

Server fails to hit the bottom of the shuttlecock.(Image Courtesy: Feet on the service line or off the ground).

Server fails to hit the bottom of the shuttlecock.
(Image Courtesy: Feet on the service line or off the ground).

This situation occurs when a player’s racquet face should hit the bottom of the shuttlecock. If a player fails to hit the bottom of the shuttlecock when serving, the line judge will open their right hand and lightly touch the palm with their left hand to indicate a service fault.

 

 

 

 

 

4. Service too high:

Service too high.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

Service too high.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

When the server’s racquet hits the shuttlecock the entire racquet should be below waist height. If the racquet is too high when the serve is made, the service judge will place their right hand horizontally across their ribs.

 

 

 

 

5. Racquet handle should face up:

Racket handle should face up.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

Racket handle should face up.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

When a serve is made the racquet handle must be facing down at the moment the shuttlecock is hit. If the racket handle is facing up when the shuttlecock is hit the service judge will lift up their open hand with palm facing out to indicate a fault due to the racquet handle facing up.

Simple Stretching Exercises For Tennis Elbow

Stretching for Tennis Elbow.(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

Stretching for Tennis Elbow.
(Image Courtesy: http://in.victorsport.com/).

Many badminton players are likely to get an injury sort of thing called the “Tennis Elbow”. As the name applies this isn’t just the fpr those who play tennis. people who regularly play badminton, table tennis and golf, or who often lift heavy objects or overuse their wrists are those who have risk of getting tennis elbow.

When a person suffers from tennis elbow, he or she feels pain when they lift objects or straighten the wrist. This can be because of the inflammation of the bone outside of the elbow and can be painful also. When unatended, the pain can spread to the upper arm, leaving the sufferer unable to straighten their elbow and they have a feeling of resistance when turning the wrist upwards.

Some badminton players suffer from tennis elbow because the way they hold the racquet and the hitting angle and face is wrong in respect to the force apllied from the hand. So, the exact force is not delivered to the shuttle that results in severe elbow pain after playing.

When this happens, stop playing. While at the starting stages, a period of rest and wrist stretching exercise will improve the situation.

The basic remedy for tennis elbow is that, lift up the right arm so it is parallel to the floor with palm facing down and relaxed, then take hold of the outside of the fingers of the right hand with the left hand and lightly apply force until you feel a slight tightening of the wrist; keep the position for 30-60 seconds, relax, and then do same with other hand, doing 5-10 times for each hand.

Daily stretching exercises can help prevent and ease slight pain but, if the symptoms are serious, deep massage and physical therapy are also recommended in addition to stretching.

Benefits From Playing Badminton For Women

women. (Image Courtesy: descoteaux.xyz).

women.
(Image Courtesy: descoteaux.xyz).

Women today are very health consious today to have a good health, glowing skin and ofcourse youthful appearance, and a trim figure. So, women do aerobics, go cycling; do yoga or to burn the extra calories women do swimming running and gym workouts.

However, many people don’t know that there is a sport combining all kinds of physical fitness and providing all-round exercise that can give you all the above benefits and more benefits that badminton can provide for the well being expecially for women and that’s Badminton!
Lets see the benefites of playing badminton for women i nthe following paragraphs.

In general, when you play badminton the muscles of the body will alternately contract and relax in a very short space of time. So these kind of exercises makes use of our energy by also increasing the muscle strength and resilience ( the ability of the object to come back to tis original shape). If you play competitive badminton you will find you are covered in sweat in just 10 minutes of play.

For women who want to lose weight or improve their figure, badminton is the right choice. When we play badminton we naturally move back and forth numerous times, using the muscles of our upper and lower bodies. In particular, when we take a big stride or lunge or run forward to reply for an incoming shot and strike the shuttlecock, these are the times when our leg muscles expand and contract the most thus burning those extra calories and get to shape.

Another news is that Badminton improves the heart’s function. This is the reason our body sweating naturally and carries out the internal “environmental protection work.” Also, as you sweat heavily, various toxics in the body will metabolize and be expelled, leaving your whole body feeling light and burden free.

Badminton is a sport that requires a good sense of balance, coordination, skill and agility over the light object, hte shuttlecock or the bird. Since women in natural are lighter on their feet and more agile than men they actually have an advantage playing badminton. For instance, when a racquet is swung, the power of the lower body has to be used. This kind of borrowing of power undoubtedly necessary for which women has an advantage over men. This is often the reason women chose badminton as their regular sport.

Another important aspect is if one needs a natural glow on the skin, various toxins has to be expelled outside. By playing badminton all these toxins are expelled out through sweat and the elasticity of the skin is naturally preserved. When the vital energy and blood are flowing smoothly, your skin will naturally have a healthy glow.

The Split Jump

The Split jump. (Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

The Split jump.
(Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

The Split jump is technique which has to be mastered by a badminton player right from the beginner level, so that it gets straight into one mind.

Every professional player does this every time but, goes unnoticed as he wraps the footwork skills into this jump. his split jump is usually made at the center of the court after every player return a reply and comes to the center and does a split jump and then only readies himself for the next possible opponents return. This whole action phrase is completed in milliseconds, that goes un-noticed by audiences, but well felt by the player himself.

The split jump is called by many names viz., split step, bounce start. They all refer to this same footwork. Usually this Split Jump is made for a quick start towards the direction of the shuttle, so that the player reaches the shuttle early and has time to reply his best to his opponent.

The timing for this split jump is split second and you are start movind towards the direction of the shuttle for the best reply.

The important thing to understand is that must not wait. Your pushing off movement should immediately follow your split jump. Otherwise, the feel of the split jump and your quick movement towards the shuttle is lost.

Badminton lunges Or The Lunge Technique

The lunge. (Image Courtesy: www.how-to-play-badminton.com).

The lunge.
(Image Courtesy: www.how-to-play-badminton.com).

The lunge is one of the most fundamental skills requires to play abadminton as a badminton player. This footwork is essentila to be used in the badminton court to play badminton, both in regular training schedules and in competitive badminton scenerio.

Lunges are the final footstep involved to be in position with your foot well away from your body in a low posture with the lunging knee bent before one hits hits the shuttle to finish your movement.

A proper lunge posture is to keep the upper body upright throughout the lunge, the corresponding racquet foot should be in front, aligned to the direction of the shuttle with your knees bent for balance and your arms above your legs to give you the maximum reach towards hitting the shuttle. For most right handed players, they should lunge with their leading right foot to stay in balance and arms above their legs for maximum reach.

If one fails to control the upper body movement, then the player has to bend at the waist too much and will have difficulty in recovering for the next shot. If your lunge technique is slightly wrong, you will damage your knees or ankles. So care should be taken to see to it that whatever direction you are lunging in, your leading foot must point that way only thus avoiding injuries.

Another common error most beginners tend to make is that contacting the floor with the toe first, or all of the foot together. You must make contact with the ground with your heel first then move into the rest of the foot. This is done deliberately by throwing out your lower leg in the direction of your lunge, so that your toes are points upwards. This footwork is all set for a player by doing shadow badminton drills or shuttle run or multishuttle drills with conscious effort.

By practicing this foot contact, you will considerably reduce the pressure from your joints.

The Steps Pattern: The Shadow Badminton

(Image Courtesy:  shadowbadmintontraining.wordpress.com).

(Image Courtesy: shadowbadmintontraining.wordpress.com).

Steps are the basic and the natural element of movement a player has to adhere inside the badminton court. Everyone knows how to put one foot in front of the other and move.

But in badminton, you need to be comfortable stepping and moving in all the directions viz., forwards, backwards, sideways, and diagonally. Everyone is comfortable stepping forwards. But most people will not be familiar to move in all directions except the forward movement. There are few, who succeed on their first attempt.

But this is fundamental to badminton. You must learn to move comfortably inside the court. This is also called the basic “Shadow badminton”.

Serve high, do a split jump immediately after you serve in the center. Now, start from the centre with your racquet leg first in the forehand net corner direction followed by the non racquet leg. Remember to keep the racquet leg front always and the other leg back for balance. Imagine playing a net lift. After you play the shot, run backwards to the center of the court, do a split jump then try moving towards the backhand forecourt corner. Remember to keep the racquet leg front always and the other leg back for balance. Also remember to switch to backhand grip while you move to the backhand forecourt. Now imagine playing a high backhand lift. After playing the shot run back to the center of the court and split jump.

The step pattern to move to the rear court is slightly different. To the forehand rear corner, you have to make use of a chasse moment. It means start with your racquet leg to move diagonally to the forehand rear court, follow the racquet leg with the other leg. The other leg should not overtake the racquet leg at any point of time. Imagine playing a clear. The nrun back to the center for a split jump.

The step pattern to the backhand rear court is, start with your racquet leg then use back running to move to the backhand rear court. Play an imaginary shot. Run back to the center of the court and do the split jump.

This step pattern has to be followed for all the four corners until you are able to move fast and with “Soft feet”. Soft feet is the term used in professional badminton where the movement towards all hte corners of the badminton court does not return any unwanted noise or sound.

The Steps Pattern: The Shuttle Picking/Run (Multishuttle) – All Directions

 (Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

(Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

The shuttle run is one of the most effective methods of building strength to one’s legs and also to improve one’s endurance and movement inside the badminton court.

The shuttle picking is half the same technique as the shuttle run, but varies only in the movement and direction where a player moves inside the court along with the shuttle. For a beginner, place 3 or 4 shuttles on the ground with the feathers touching the round in a upright position at the forehand net corner under the net over the net line. Now, the player has to start from the center with a split jump for the first shuttle, run towards the forehand net corner keep the racquet leg front, the other leg back for balance, bend down, reach to the shuttle and pick one shuttle at a time. Now the player has to back run to the centre, do a split jump run to the rear forehand court when he reaches near the rear service line, keep the racquet leg front, the other leg back for balance, bend down, place the shuttle on the last rear court singles line. Turn in an anti-clockwise direction,
again run to the center do the split jump run front to grab the other shuttle.

Complete this drill until all the shuttles arrive to the forehand rear court. Now for the last shuttle, just
place the last shuttle on the ground still on your hand, now run to the centre of the court, do a split jump and run diagonally to the backhand forecourt with the shuttle in your hand keep the racquet leg front, the other leg back for balance, bend down, place the shuttle on the front line under the net. Make sure all the shuttles arrive here.

Now pick the shuttles one by one from the backhnad forehand court to the backhand rear court. follow the above procedures, after placing the first shuttle, turn to your right and run to the centre and proceed as usual. Make sure all the shuttles arrive at the backhand rear court.

For the last shuttle, now move ahead diagonally to the place from where you picked the first shuttle at the forehand forecourt and place the shuttle one by one for completing the schedule.

This footwork can be improvised by clocking with time.

The Steps Pattern: The Shuttle Picking/Run (Single shuttle) – All Directions

 (Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

(Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

The shuttle run is one of the most effective methods of building strength to one’s legs and also to improve one’s endurance and movement inside the badminton court.

For a beginner or an intermediate player, place a single shuttle on the ground with the feathers touching the round in a upright position at the forehand net corner under the net over the net line. Now, the player has to start from the center with a split jump for the first shuttle, run towards the forehand net corner keep the racquet leg front, the other leg back for balance, bend down, reach to the shuttle and pick it, back run to the centre, do a split jump run to the rear forehand court when he reaches near the rear service line, keep the racquet leg front, the other leg back for balance, bend down, place and immediately take the the shuttle from the last rear court singles line turn in an anti-clockwise direction, again run to the center do the split jump run front to the backhand forecourt with the shuttle in your hand keep the racquet leg front, the other leg back for balance, bend down, place the shuttle on the front line under the net. Now pick the shuttle from the backhand forehand court to the backhand rear court, follow the above procedures moving via the centre court touch the rear court line with the shuttle in hand turn to your right and run to the centre and proceed as usual now move ahead diagonally to the place from where you picked the shuttle at the forehand forecourt. Now repeatthis whole episode for 2 minutes or for 3 minutes. for 3 repetitions. Take 3 minutes rest inbetween sets.

This footwork can be improvised by clocking with time.

The Steps Pattern: The Shuttle Picking – Front And Back

 (Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

(Image Courtesy: www.youtube.com).

The “shuttle picking” or the “shuttle run” is one of the most effective methods of building strength to one’s legs and also to improve one’s movement in side the court.

For a beginner, place 3 or 4 shuttles on the ground with the cock looking at the ceilin at the forehand net corner under the net over the net line. Now, the player has to start from the center with a split jump for the first shuttle, run towards the forehand net corner keep the racquet leg front, the other leg back for balance, bend down, reach to the shuttle and pick one shuttle at a time. Back run to the rear court stand inside the rear service line with the shuttle hitting pose, try throwing the shuttle over the net with the forehand clear action. Remember after you throw the shuttle, the throwing hand and the corresponding leg should be in front of you.

Now run front to pick another shuttle, again proceed with the same action until the shuttle gets over. Rest for some time depending on your fitness level and the number of shuttles. Start over again. Do atleast 3 repetitions to complete the drill for a beginner per session. Gradually increase the shuttle number as the player get fitter.